From what i understand, 2.675 and numpy.float64(2.675) are both the same number. However, round(2.675, 2) gives 2.67, while round(np.float64(2.675), 2) gives 2.68. Why does this happen? import numpy ...

From what i understand, 2.675 and numpy.float64(2.675) are both the same number. However, round(2.675, 2) gives 2.67, while round(np.float64(2.675), 2) gives 2.68. Why does this happen? import numpy ...

So I am trying to understand partial: import functools def f(x,y) : print x+y g0 = functools.partial( f, 3 ) g0(1) 4 # Works as expected In: g1 = functools.partial( f, y=3 ) g1(1) 4 # ...

So I am trying to understand partial: import functools def f(x,y) : print x+y g0 = functools.partial( f, 3 ) g0(1) 4 # Works as expected In: g1 = functools.partial( f, y=3 ) g1(1) 4 # ...

I am trying to setup a remote conda interpreter on MacOS Mojave PyCharm for Anaconda 2019.1.2 Pro, and can't get it to work. My existing remote conda environment (v4.5.12) is running on an Ubuntu 16 ...

I am trying to setup a remote conda interpreter on MacOS Mojave PyCharm for Anaconda 2019.1.2 Pro, and can't get it to work. My existing remote conda environment (v4.5.12) is running on an Ubuntu 16 ...

I'm trying to use Travis CI on a C library that uses custom python3-based build scripts. When the repository gets built, it fails on ./configure because configure uses Python 3, which isn't installed ...

I'm trying to use Travis CI on a C library that uses custom python3-based build scripts. When the repository gets built, it fails on ./configure because configure uses Python 3, which isn't installed ...

So, i trying to install with the command ecmwf api client conda install -c conda-forge ecmwf-api-client then the warning in the title shows up. I don't know how to proceede (base) C:\Users\caina>...

So, i trying to install with the command ecmwf api client conda install -c conda-forge ecmwf-api-client then the warning in the title shows up. I don't know how to proceede (base) C:\Users\caina>...

I forked a GitHub project in Python. After running the project for the first time, some .pyc files appeared inside. Should I put them under version control and commit them to my fork?

I forked a GitHub project in Python. After running the project for the first time, some .pyc files appeared inside. Should I put them under version control and commit them to my fork?

Consider the following code: from typing import Callable, TypeVar T = TypeVar('T') def middle_man( producer: Callable[[], T], consumer: Callable[[T], None] ) -> None: consumer(...

Consider the following code: from typing import Callable, TypeVar T = TypeVar('T') def middle_man( producer: Callable[[], T], consumer: Callable[[T], None] ) -> None: consumer(...

I'm trying to pickle an object of a (new-style) class I defined. But I'm getting the following error: >>> with open('temp/connection.pickle','w') as f: ... pickle.dump(c,f) ... Traceback ...

I'm trying to pickle an object of a (new-style) class I defined. But I'm getting the following error: >>> with open('temp/connection.pickle','w') as f: ... pickle.dump(c,f) ... Traceback ...

NLTK version 3.4.5. Python 3.7.4. OSX version 10.14.5. Upgrading the codebase from 2.7, started running into this issue just now. I've done a fresh no-cache reinstall of all packages and extensions, ...

NLTK version 3.4.5. Python 3.7.4. OSX version 10.14.5. Upgrading the codebase from 2.7, started running into this issue just now. I've done a fresh no-cache reinstall of all packages and extensions, ...